Cabbage Is More Beneficial Than You Think

Fresh Organic CabbageMany of you may not like cabbage, but please read the article below. It may change your perspective about this humble vegetable.

Image by New Talent Modelling via Flickr

Cabbage

What’s New and Beneficial About Cabbage

Cabbage can provide you with some special cholesterol-lowering benefits if you will cook it by steaming. The fiber-related components in cabbage do a better job of binding together with bile acids in your digestive tract when they’ve been steamed. When this binding process takes place, it’s easier for bile acids to be excreted, and the result is a lowering of your cholesterol levels. Raw cabbage still has cholesterol-lowering ability, just not as much as steamed cabbage.

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WHFoods Recommendations

You’ll want to include cabbage as one of the cruciferous vegetables you eat on a regular basis if you want to receive the fantastic health benefits provided by the cruciferous vegetable family. At a minimum, include cruciferous vegetables as part of your diet 2-3 times per week, and make the serving size at least 1-1/2 cups. Even better from a health standpoint, enjoy cabbage and other vegetables from the cruciferous vegetable group 4-5 times per week, and increase your serving size to 2 cups.

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cabbage

Red Cabbage

While green cabbage is the most commonly eaten variety of cabbage, we highly recommend trying red cabbage because of it added nutritional benefits and its robust hearty flavor. We don’t think you will be disappointed. The rich red color of red cabbage reflects it concentration of anthocyanin polyphenols, which contribute to red cabbage containing significantly more protective phytonutrients than green cabbage. Interest in anthocyanin pigments continues to intensify because of their health benefits as dietary antioxidants, as an anti-inflammatory, and their potentially protective, preventative, and therapeutic roles in a number of human diseases.

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Health Benefits

Cancer prevention tops all other areas of health research with regard to cabbage and its outstanding benefits. More than 475 studies have examined the role of this cruciferous vegetable in cancer prevention (and in some cases, cancer treatment). The uniqueness of cabbage in cancer prevention is due to the three different types of nutrient richness found in this widely enjoyed food. The three types are (1) antioxidant richness, (2) anti-inflammatory richness, and (3) richness in glucosinolates.

via Food of the Week: Bok Choy

Anti-Inflammatory Benefits

Without sufficient intake of anti-inflammatory nutrients, regulation of our inflammatory system can become compromised, and we can experience the problem of chronic inflammation. Especially when combined together with oxidative stress, chronic inflammation is a risk factor for development of cancer.

via Food of the Week: Bok Choy

Cardiovascular Support

You can count on cabbage to provide your cardiovascular system with valuable support in the form of cholesterol reduction. Researchers understand exactly how this process takes place. Your liver uses cholesterol as a basic building block to produce bile acids. Bile acids are specialized molecules that aid in the digestion and absorption of fat through a process called emulsification. These molecules are typically stored in fluid form in your gall bladder, and when you eat a fat-containing meal, they get released into the intestine where they help ready the fat for interaction with enzymes and eventual absorption up into the body. When you eat cabbage, fiber-related nutrients in this cruciferous vegetable bind together with some of the bile acids in the intestine in such a way that they simply stay inside the intestine and pass out of your body in a bowel movement, rather than getting absorbed along with the fat they have emulsified. When this happens, your liver needs to replace the lost bile acids by drawing upon your existing supply of cholesterol, and as a result, your cholesterol level drops down. Cabbage provides you with this cholesterol-lowering benefit whether it is raw or cooked. However, a recent study has shown that the cholesterol-lowering ability of raw cabbage improves significantly when it is steamed. In fact, when the cholesterol-lowering ability of steamed cabbage was compared with the cholesterol-lowering ability of the prescription drug cholestyramine (a medication that is taken for the purpose of lowering cholesterol), cabbage bound 17% as many bile acids (based on a standard of comparison involving total dietary fiber).

via Food of the Week: Bok Choy

Conclusion is to eat a well rounded plant based diet.

…and there are people who really love cabbage.

 

How can I forget to share a recipe with you.

Some interesting facts about cabbage:

Traditionally, wild cabbage was used as an aphrodisiac.

Cabbage Quote:

Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education. – Mark Twain

A Simple Way To Make Breakfast: Banana Oat Smoothie

simple breakfastOn the previous post, I showed you an article about skipping breakfast and how it may cause heart disease. Now as promised I will show you examples of how you can make a simple, healthy breakfast.

Last week, I bought a big bag of frozen raspberries to make some raspberry lemonade for my Mary Kay party. I have a bunch leftover, so I thought I’d use them in a smoothie. I’m typically not a huge raspberry person, although 

Banana-less Raspberry Oat Smoothie – Freeing Imperfections

Or something equally as non-breakfasty. Enter: THE SMOOTHIE. peanut butter banana oatmeal smoothie. I’ve been wanting to make this smoothie since June of last year. We were in Cleveland for my cousin’s (awesome!) 

ᔥPeanut Butter-Banana Oatmeal Smoothie | The Kitchen Paper

So instead I made a few smoothies, and this banana-oat version is my favorite of the bunch. I’ve never made a smoothie with oats before and they did add a little bit of texture, but in a good way – I enjoyed it! The smoothie has 

ᔥTracey’s Culinary Adventures: Banana-Oat Smoothie

Above are 3 version of Banana Oat Smoothie which you make for breakfast. Its easy to make and easy to consume. Note that the recipe are not necessary vegan so all you need to do is to replace the non vegan ingredient to a vegan substitute.

 

Strawberry Banana Oatmeal Smoothie http://t.co/VJIGdeQyYz via @anniecannie

— Margarita Ibbott (@) Wed Jul 24 2013

 

simple breakfast

Now that you have all these resources to make a delicious breakfast on the go, there is no more excuse to skip your breakfast.

If you want to buy a blender for your smoothie, do consider buying through our amazon link. It does not cost you more. Do share this post on your social network as well or leave a comment.

Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana. – Lisa Grossman

Leftover Turkey Pie

How did someone come up with having turkey for Christmas feasts? Why on earth would you cook something so large, you have to eat it for the next 2 years?

Since we all have to OD on turkey, might as well do it in different ways. I made the pie crust a night in advance and just had to cook the fillings before baking the pie. The pie crust recipe can be found here.

Ingredients (pie fillings enough for 1 large and 6 small pies)
leftover turkey meat, shredded (about 4 cups )
1.5 large carrots. diced
3 large white onions, diced
1 can of button mushrooms, sliced
butter for frying (approx 4 tbsp)
1 cup stock (I used chicken but veg stock works just as well)
1 tbsp cornflour or plain flour mixed with 1/2 cup water for starch
pepper and salt for seasoning (optional, as the turkey, butter and stock is already tasty on its own)
1 egg yolk for brushing onto pie pastry to get that golden brown tinge

In a large pan, melt butter and fry the onions and carrots till soft. Add mushrooms, turkey and fry till fragrant. Add stock, mix well and add starch while constantly stirring the stock to prevent lumps. Quickly remove from heat. Let the divine mixture cool, and get to work with the pie crust.

I have to say it looks good considering its molded by pie virgins A-gal and Tommy.

Few days before this, my online conversation with Tommy went like this:
me: We’re having Death by Turkey session 2, starring Turkey Pie at A-gal’s. Wanna come?
T: Huh?
me: Sunday lunch. Turkey. You. Come?
T: Ok. What do I bring?
me: We’re having pie. A salad would be nice..
T: Sure! How do you cook a salad?
me: *sound of crickets*
T: Hallo?
me: Nevermind. Just bring drinks.

Never one to let people down, Tommy brought not only drinks but this as well.

Don’t ask. Just..don’t.

Achar!


This is a traditional and wonderfully appetizing pickle commonly available in Singapore and Malaysia (though I sometimes see this in Indian food stalls too). Recipe is passed directly with love from Mum. As with all pickles, adjust the dressing according to taste. Do remember to always add the minimum amounts first, taste, and add more along the way. Keeps well in the refrigerator up to a week, although this has never sat in ours for more than 2 days!

Ingredients
2 cucumbers, deseeded
1 carrot, skinned
- cut the above into julienne, put into a large mixing bowl and rub with 3 tsp of salt. Then rinse the vegetables and drain dry before mixing in the rest of the vegetables.
1 turnip, skinned and julienne
3 large green chillies, deseeded & sliced
2 slices of ripe, sweet pineapple, cut into cubes
Dressing (taste before adding more to suit taste)
1.5-2.5 tbsp sea salt
3-4 tbsp white sugar
1/3-1/2 cup white vinegar (depending on how sour you like yours)
2 tbsp chilli powder
Garnish
3-4 tbsp chopped roasted peanuts
sprig of coriander (optional)

Drain dry all cut vegetables, put into large mixing bowl and add all dressing in its minimum amounts and mix well. Taste and gradually add more. During last few mix, add in chopped peanuts, top with coriander (optional) and serve. Can be served chilled as well.

3-step Tofu


Mum said this was one of grandpa’s favourite dish, and she loved making it for him because it’s so easy. Besides being so nutritious and full of proteins, I believe it’s the simplest tofu recipe ever. I mean EVER! Don’t you not believe it!

I’ll show you! I’ll show you all!!

Ingredients (serves 3-4)
2 packets of silken tofu, drained of excess water
3 tbs of chopped spring onions
3 tbs of fried shallots
3-4 tbs of dark soya sauce
2 tbs of light soya sauce
1 tbs of oyster sauce (optional)
dash of sesame oil & white ground pepper
a sprig or 2 of Chinese parsley (optional)

Cut tofu into smaller cubes, or not, if you can’t be bother.

Add the sesame oil.

Steam for 5 minutes. Remove from wok and immediately drizzle all the condiments on the tofu. Lastly add all the greens and fried shallots over it.

I took more time posting this than actually making the tofu dish. It’s that fast and simple!

Sweet Potato & Edamame Croquette


The easiest croquette ever. I mean ever!
The amount of edamame to use simply depends on how much sweet potatoes you’re making. A quarter portion of edamame to sweet potatoes is a good gauge. No condiments are required as these crispies have the sweetness from the sweet potatoes and the saltiness from the edamame beans. I used 3 Japanese purple skin sweet potatoes here for 2 persons. Delish!

Just peel and steam some sweet potatoes till they are soft. Cooks faster when you cut them up.

Then peel open the edamame.

Such funny hairy peas they are!

Mash up the steamed sweet potatoes and mix the edamame into the sweet mash.

Roll and mould the mixture into patties and fry them on a pan of hot oil. Be careful to turn down the heat as the patties brown very quickly.

And you have now these little sweet smiley sunshiney faces!

I need Help

And please hurry while you’re at it!

Recently I developed a penchant for deep fried foods. Any sort of deep fried golden crispy greatness.  I dip everything I can lay my paws on in a batter and dump them in a cauldron of bubbling canola oil. The sticky glutinous sweet cakes (Nian Gao) and bananas above were the victims of my food forage yesterday.

Coincidently fried Nian Gao is also a childhood comfort food for me. Mum used to sandwich the Nian Gao with sweet potatoes before frying the sweet gooey stuff. She would put the just fried sweet cakes on a kitchen towel to drain off the excess oil before transferring them onto a platter. But somehow only a small percentage of the fried cakes made it to the platter. Most of them had gotten straight into my mouth and then into my quickly expanding mid-section. And I always wonder why I was such a chubby kid!

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Pineapple Tarts

Hello everybody. *taps into microphone*. I am back and I have an important announcement to make.

Chinese New Year is not Chinese New Year without pineapple pastries. Warning. Never attempt Chinese New Year without pineapple pastries. Never! Never ever!!

Otherwise be prepared to face your own gastronomic perils!

And become the laughing stock of the neighbourhood!

And get outcast by relatives!!

Your great grand-children might be black-listed from Havard!!!

Ok I’m a nutcase. What I’m not kidding about though, is how simple to make and delicious these little buggers are.

Ingredients (makes 46 tarts/balls)
220g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
2 egg yolks
375g plain flour
2 tbsp corn flour
50g icing sugar
1/4 tsp salt
2 egg yolk for egg wash

About 530gm of cooked pineapple jam.
(either made from scratch or pre-made ones from the supermarket)
To make pineapple jam from scratch, peel and grate 2 ripe pineapples. Then squeeze gently to extract excess juice, but not till its as dry as the Sahara.
Add about 360gm of caster sugar and 5-6 cloves, and cook over low heat till sugar melts. The mixture should be wet and sticky, but with too much liquid. By then you should be exhausted. Put the jam in the fridge and make the tarts another day.

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